Writer’s Life: Trust within the writing community

Trust is everything within the writer’s community and hopefully all of us can continue to grow together.

Being a writer has many functions and special elements. It includes having faith in your own abilities, staying true to your story, and trust within the writer’s community. Without trust, there isn’t anything to build on within all our special networks.

The special thing with writers is that no writer should have to endure any storm alone. There are groups all over social media whether it is Facebook or the large writer’s community on Twitter. It’s not a competition (or shouldn’t be) and most of all there’s room for all of us.

The whole writer’s community should be the envy of the entire world. It’s a supportive place where everyone gets along and just wants to see everyone succeed. That is rare and something that keeps the writer’s community together.

The issue with any group or family is that sometimes there are people who may not be honest. They may try to take advantage of the generosity and support of other writers. Every group has it and hopefully, there aren’t many within the writer’s community.

The worse part about it is that when there is a reason to not have trust, things fall apart. My hope is that the writer’s community never falls apart because of those who may not have others best interests in mind. If there are those who only have themselves in mind with a lack of transparency, my hope is that other members of the writing community will watch out for each other.

It will continue to grow every single day and I hope it continues to grow with a mutual interest of completing work and supporting each other as the work pours in with new content of all genres and styles.

This network is something special on Twitter and something that has helped us grow as writers, entrepreneurs, and in some cases, it has helped us excel in other respective professions. There are no limits to what could possibly happen with us next on our journeys.

Some of us have very little support and others of us have no support at all. The writer’s community is the cream of the crop in terms of a support system. That’s why preserving it and not losing faith in it is critical.

If you need someone, the community is always only just a tweet away #WritersCommunity or #Writingcommunity.  I am always just a tweet or direct message away @Wrlter4LifeJC for any writers or artists. Let’s all be there to support and be good to each other with our individual circumstances and watch each other thrive.

A Writer’s journey: True friends & writing community

The journey before joining the writing community on Twitter helped shape me to who I am today, the good friends and the not so good. Here is my story as a writer.

Before joining Twitter a few years back, I was primarily writing whatever was on my mind and only sharing it with a few people. I decided that I wanted to expand and reach people, and another writer who I knew for many years was saying the same thing. I thought this person felt the same way, but it turned out to be a dark period while trying to just gain the confidence to go above and beyond.

While talking to this person, I told him that we should really try Twitter. At the time, we both didn’t even know where to begin. He released a book and I was writing blogs for my first platform and wanted to get serious about screenwriting. I was mentally preparing myself to go on Twitter, since I also wanted to follow wrestlers, Walking Dead, actors, and other writers too.

The platform I was writing for didn’t work out. I was still determined to keep going and find other ways to write. I made the mistake of underestimating the stress with personal things, Shayla Hyde kept in contact with me, Barbi Hayden never hesitated to give a positive message even with her busy schedule, Brittany and Kikyo gave tough love when I didn’t want to do it anymore, and Nyla always gave genuine love and care. It made it easier to go through with Twitter and taking it day by day, and I felt great.

My Twitter profile was made, and I was ready for whatever was next. He left a message saying that it’s a “waste of time” and he “won’t do it”. I was not so angry that he pulled out, but angrier that it’s a writer telling another writer that something is a “waste of time”. It’s annoying to hear it from non-writers, but it’s worse hearing it from a fellow writer. It made it harder and I felt alone in it as I went through with it.

My friends Shayla, Kikyo, Brittany, Barbi, and Nyla all continued to be there to remind me that I wasn’t alone with the process. The stress and getting knocked a few steps back after taking three steps forward were the hardest. It was a process with the reoccurring personal hurdles as well as challenges presented by what that writer said to me. It was hanging over my head like a dark cloud.

Time went by, and eventually with love and support from them and discovering the writing community made all the difference in the world. From writing on my own website to becoming a finalist for the Hollywood Screenplay contest. I have done things that I have never imagined possible.

The support of the writing community on Twitter is best described as a never-ending energy field by other hardworking writers. Whether I am working on my scripts or sharing stories with the writing community like right now. I have been able to share stories and thoughts about writing. No matter what, no one can face the journey alone, because the writing field can be a long dark lonely road.

The people who support you become so much more than just friends. Brittany, Nyla, Shayla, Kikyo, and Barbi all became family. When I say family, I mean through the best times, and worse times they are there. So many times, people will only want to be around someone when they are winning, but the moment they lose even a little, the support disappears. The people who become family don’t care about it, they just want your happiness and to see you succeed.

Having the writing community helps, but the journey before finding the writing community is just as important. To never forget the struggles, your true friends, and finding yourself as a writer. At first, I wanted to just forget about the past, but now I don’t ever want to forget. The writing community is the energy that gives you more strength and positivity to build on.

Thinking about it keeps you hungry and while it may not be healthy to dwell on it. It is good to think about it occasionally to light a fire inside of you to power through your work. It can also be the worse thing to happen when overthinking it, and best to take a step back to take care of yourself when thinking about it becomes overwhelming.

If you haven’t joined Twitter or haven’t joined the writing community, take the chance and do it. Get to know people and build with the never-ending energy that shines with the writing community. It will be a great topper for the support you already have or give you that needed a boost to succeed.

Follow me @Writer4LifeJC and don’t forget to join #WritingCommunity on Twitter, and as always follow Social Media Uncut for latest blogs and interviews.

A writer’s life: What is normal?

So many times, we are told what is acceptable when it comes to being a writer….I say ENOUGH!

Since the beginning of the year, I have personally struggled with the idea of being involved in writing in so many ways. I write blogs, scripts, articles, and an interest in authorship eventually. It was primarily because of an institution giving an idea that writing so many genres and many areas of writing are “too much” or “not normal”. That’s the primary pressure point that made the beginning of 2019 not as pleasant as I have hoped.

The struggle internally as a writer is hard enough, but when you add institution or other people, it can make it unbearable. Every writer is different and that’s what makes our craft and community so interesting. Who is to say that a screenwriter should only be a screenwriter? Who is to say an author can’t become a poet too? Who is to say a writer can’t take on three or more categories? The ones who have made those statements do not help causes.

Why would anyone be limited to a few categories? Writing is such a big art that it is hard for a writer with such passion to contain themselves to one category. It is a beautiful thing when an author crosses over into blogging and screenwriting. That means they have a story they want to share, and they are using their love for writing in general to explore other ways to convey the message.

The toxic mindset of “limits” or “normal” is something that should always be challenged. What is normal? Why do we have to limit ourselves to a set of rules to please certain people or institutions? Why should we limit ourselves when we know there are unlimited possibilities?

There are some writers who may crossover and some writers who stick within only one. Every single writer who has the true love and passion has this in common, there are no limits. We should be able to crossover to multiple genres and write a wide range of pieces in different subfields without being self-cautious about it.

The hope I have in the future is that writers can just write how much they want when they want, and what they want without negative feeling. If you have that dream of being an author, or a screenwriter, blogger or anything, I say go for it. Keep doing what makes you happy and keep rising above the institutional ridicule.

Inside A Writer’s Mind: Part Three of Three Series

Submitting a pitch or submitting to festivals is only half the battle, the battle AFTER is a battle of a lifetime

The final part of the series is something that is ongoing as we speak. After the script is done, and you have done everything possible, you hand it in either to a festival or pitch it. It’s a scary experience, and I am trying my hardest to not overthink it. The hardest thing a writer can do is overthink and feel like their work isn’t good enough.

I have handed in 3 short movies, 1 full-length movie, 1 TV pilot. They are all submitted, and some days are better than others. I sit there and think “crap, why didn’t I do that?”, or “crap should have omitted that part”, and I start nitpicking even after I did all I can for the script. It is torture, and I keep revisiting and reciting it over and over in my head.

The self-doubt is normal and is the hardest to overcome. That is truly why having the support of other writers and having a whole community support each other is vital. Every writer goes through it one way or another. A person who does not write will never truly understand.

Since being on Twitter, I truly have met some amazing writers. it is truly a community and a family that sticks together.  I have seen that every time I am on Twitter. The likelihood that another writer is going through the same thing you are going through is high and being there as support makes a difference.

Rejection is a normal fear that goes with anything. You wonder about the possible rejection, and what you could possibly do next to make it all work. It is a learning process to calm down and embrace the challenge and whatever may come.

I mean rejection has come my way numerous times in the past mainly when it comes to the love life, but the big difference is that there is a lot I can do in the future to make it right for my projects (and of course it’s less complicated than a relationship). No matter what, I hope the journey for all writers will continue no matter the challenge of self-doubt and keep pushing forward with what we all love to do.

Inside A Writer’s Mind: Part Two of Three Series

The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly side of writing all in one. It may seem impossible, but is it really impossible?

It has been a few weeks since part one of the series. The past weeks since part one was my journey to making part two. One of the hardest things to go through as a writer is a rejection. While completing my script and handing it into a festival, I began to this about my first time handing a script in.

My first script ever, of course, got rejected. It was a short script, and it was my first time doing a script ever. It consumed me for the longest time, to the point that I had to take a break from writing scripts for a few months after the rejection. The point of my writing part two is to show how the negative experience that all writers will go through can be exhausting, but in the end, worth it as we grow.

The first short script that was on my mind, was Simon Says. It was a short script only twelve pages long. It was initially a project, and I worked on it and handed it in. I was told the script was good, and I did what I had to do to the script and handed it into a festival. The script was rejected, and I was crushed.

I had to take time off from writing scripts after that. It is hard to get a rejection for your work, and no matter what it hurts. it’ll make you question yourself. I went through long nights trying to figure out where I went wrong with the script, and for the life of me, I couldn’t come up with an answer. It drove me crazy, and for a good three months, I was not a pleasant person to talk to at all.

As time went by, I eventually accepted the fact that Simon Says was a rejection. I continued classes and met a couple of amazing film writing teachers through Southern New Hampshire University. They not only helped hone my skills but helped me understand a fundamental fact that writing is a process, and it will take a long time.

That was a critical turning point in how I have gotten to this point as a writer. My mind is at ease, and now I understand that rejection of my future scripts could come, but there is always more I can do to improve my script. The key is never giving up and to keep trying.

I always think about Simon Says and how it didn’t make it. It keeps me motivated to write my scripts and make them better. Looking back at Simon Says, I laugh at it when I look at it. I wonder what I was thinking when I wrote that. I have zero intentions to work on Simon Says ever again. While staring at it, I just can’t help but wonder why that person told me the script was good. It was the worst thing I have ever written in general.

It may knock you in a slump for a while, that is normal. A writer’s mind should always have time, especially if they need it. When that period is over, it is the best period you can imagine in terms of motivation to keep going. Turn the bad and make it into the best thing possible.

The final part of the series for the writer’s mind will be coming later, and it won’t take as long as it did for this one. If you haven’t read Inside A Writer’s Mind: Part one of Three yet, be sure to read part one. Part three the final part of this series will be coming soon.